Hard Things

Sitting down I’m bent over, one arm across my middle, other arm bent, with my phone in my hand up to my ear. I stare at my lap, half-listening, mumbling “yeah,” and “mmhmm”. She’s rambling, yet concise, filling me in on the details of her day, her week, and her month. She had called me during the weekend of the latest anniversary and left me a lengthy message telling me she’s thinking of me and that she loves me but that I need to take care of things- take care of the ashes. Except she framed it in her own way that she does, telling me that she’s been setting her intent to the universe that they would be brought home. My mouth tasted sour. I hadn’t called her back until today.

She asks me what’s new in my life- do I have any new friends, do I have any new special friends? I laugh a real laugh and tell her that I always have new friends, but no, no-one special (and that I’m okay with that). I don’t really know what else to say, so I talk about the trip that I have planned later this month, and that the weather is so nice here but so dry. There’s always new stuff around here, but nothing really changes, is what I’m trying to throw down, and I’m positive she gets it. I sit there, more hunched over now, anticipating that question again.

Having to do hard things is all part of this. I tell myself that in the same way you would tell a child it’s okay to be sad sometimes. When I think about doing those hard things I’ve had to do, and the hard things I have to do in the future, it feels like metal on metal. It sounds like I’ve bottomed-out in a shitty parking lot. It’s a pain that will never really go away, so I grin and bear it anyways and carry on. We shall overcome.

My brain’s adapted, I think, and changed, so now it seems I process things bit-by-bit. The process is sequential, and each small hard thing needs to be isolated and dealt with on its own, because the whole would be phenomenally overwhelming. Take things as they come not to get bogged down and heavy. Having to live this way is not by choice. It sucks. Life sucks. Everything and everyone sucks. But not all of the time-when you have to be in pain, suddenly good things become better, and you start seeing magic in the previously mundane. Maybe that’s a consequence of growing up though, being able to see through the rain. Grown-up or not (I think not), I have this feeling that my experience has amplified my gratitude. As some law of physics turned cliche goes, for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. You experience intense pain and all the while long for the hurting to stop, and as terrible or horrific the experience is, a voice in the recesses of your mind tells you it’s momentary and this too shall pass. No matter how bad it gets, you must tell yourself to LISTEN because that small voice is right. Keep pushing; punch through walls. Come out on the other side and you’ll feel the light. Revel in it.

We talk more about nothing, and I feel uncomfortable. Why does this feel awkward. In the end, the question doesn’t come (at least not directly). We hang-up, and I feel like I’ve swallowed a large pill, the discomfort finding its way into my esophagus. I’ve successfully avoided this conversation for now, although I know it’s future appearance is inevitable. I think briefly about all of the things I’ll have to do to get it done. Phone calls. Flight-booking. Time off work. All of that practical stuff. Then, seeing people I haven’t seen in years, people who were like family growing up when we lived back there (home). Their presence will evoke a lot in me, I know. Then, seeing relatives and being uncomfortable. I’m worried the whole saga will be not an experience, but a RE-experience, one that I really don’t want. I’m getting ahead of myself, and decide to put it on the shelf for later (I do that often- it’s a roomy shelf).

I get ready to go for a run- a welcome medicine- to shake it off. The sun is bright and hot and I can feel myself start to sweat immediately. I feel happy out here, and I feel deep appreciation for where I live and the decision I had made three years ago to move here. I had thought naively that I was through the thick of it, and I resent having to deal with more. Part of me also feels intensely guilty for avoiding for so long, but I now know how to counter that with the rationale that few people have (or maybe no one has) been through what I have, and what would anyone else do in this position? I squint into the light and remind myself that this all can be broken down into smaller pieces that can (and will) be dealt with individually. The reality of this is the discomfort and the hurt, but that each small piece will be momentary. Just hard things, and that’s okay.

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